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Shows

Tuca and Bertie Season 3: Episode 8 Review: “Fledgling Day”

I’m jumping ahead a bit in terms of episode reviews, but I recently saw this new episode, and it may be one of my favorites this season.

“Fledgling Day” is another version of Mother’s Day and like most holidays, it takes over in this episode. Parent birds celebrate by spitting into their children’s mouths, just like real birds. Bertie is spending the day with her mom, which makes her nervous. She and her mom aren’t super close, so Bertie plans it all out. They’re going for dinner and getting their nails done. Bertie is anxious about what they’ll talk about and if they’ll have enough to say.

She decides that they’ll bond over a weird neighbor that Bertie’s mom, Anna, can’t stand.

Because this is television, and perhaps because art imitates life, all of Bertie’s plans and conversation topics fall flat. Dinner is awkward as they watch a close mother and daughter act cutesy together. The mother and daughter are ducks, of course. It turns out that the annoying neighbor and her mom are friends now. All attempts at conversation turn into a puddle of awkward. Bertie’s mom thinks that Bertie should have her own bakery by now and not work under someone. Any attempt Bertie makes to show her mom Winter’s pastries in the shop that Bertie came up with the ideas for fails. it doesn’t help that Bertie considers Winter a mother figure. Anna keeps making passive aggressive remarks about how Bertie could do better. Top it off, the nail place is actually a spa.

Luckily, Bertie and her mom start to bond at the spa. This sort of reminds me of the Gilmore Girls episode where Lorelai and her mother, Emily, go to the spa and bond reluctantly.

I like how in this case, they bond after they stop trying to make conversation. It feels like that’s how it always happens in real life too. They let their guards down as they chill in the spa and enjoy the a relaxing experience together. Then, when one of the women asks if Bertie is having kids, Bertie tells her mom that she doesn’t want kids. Bertie’s mom, Anna, bursts into tears, but not for the reason you expect.

Anna cries because she’s happy that her daughter knows what she wants in life. She confides that her ex invited her for dinner and that she isn’t happy with Bertie’s dad or the life she’s in now. It was nice that Anna was chill with Bertie not wanting kids. I wonder if Anna saw her daughter sand saw her own potential and puts some of her hopes for herself onto Bertie. She wants Bertie to do her best and doesn’t want Bertie to feel like she’s living under someone else’s shadow because she feels stuck herself. She also feels like her husband doesn’t make her feel special and their married life is kind of dull, at least lately.

Maybe that’s why she was so hard on Bertie earlier, she wanted her daughter to succeed. I don’t think it was right for her to be so harsh on Bertie, but I’m glad she seemed to come to realize she needed to love her daughter where she is now. In this case, Anna’s former flame is a bit, over the top, and Bertie spits into her mom’s mouth. So, they do the fledgling day tradition, but this time, a daughter cares for her mother. I don’t know if Anna’s marriage is going to improve or not, they kind of kept that vague, but she did go back to Bertie’s dad in the end. I hope they are able to work it out. I wouldn’t mind seeing Anna more. She was hurt earlier when Bertie said her mentor Winter was a mother-figure, but I feel like she needed to hear that so that she could realize her daughter needs her.

Berties mom tried their best, but doesn’t always understand her and why she acts as how she does. Bertie’s mom wasn’t there for her when she was younger, but it seems like maybe she could get better. It seems like they are starting to understand each other more.

The episode was also pretty cool about nudity. The birds at the nude spa are blurred out (probably because of regulations on Adult Swim’s end), and the space scene definitely includes nude characters. I like how the show is pretty body positive. Body image isn’t a storyline and no one makes comments on each other’s bodies. People exist as they are in different body types. It is nice to see, and watch women encouraging each other, like when Bertie encouraged her mom to be comfortable in her skin at the spa.

I also liked how Anna supported Bertie when Bertie said that she didn’t want kids. I’m not sure I want kids myself, and I appreciate that Tuca and Bertie shows a couple (Bertie and Speckle) who are happy without kids.

For our B plot, we learned in the last episode Speckle was laid off from his job as architect (after he made a big scene at work), and now he has no clue what to do with his life. Speckle also doesn’t really know who he is outside of architecture, so he is having a crisis. The show is pretty over the top over Speckle getting fired/quitting the job, and I was honestly surprised when it happened. Now he has to rebuild and start over.

Speckle definitely overreacted or at least reacted poorly (although the people that he worked with were terrible, greedy people). If it wasn’t a comedy, I’m not sure how we’d feel about this scene, but I can relate to having to start over and figure out what the next step in your life is. I wish we’d gotten some self-reflection on his end, but hopefully we will get that later. I really hope we get more Speckle screen time, because his character is obviously going through a lot. He needs time to learn that he doesn’t need to always be the perfect/good guy, and he also needs to get out of denial and confide in Bertie about how he’s feeling.

Speckle has been having a crisis throughout the entire season, but I’m not sure Tuca is the best one to help him. In this episode, Tuca decides to teach him how to be lazy. She tell him to wear messy clothes, lay around and eat chips, and pressures him to spend money on a bunch of hobbies. At first, this sounds pretty harmless. Speckle buys a skateboard, a book to learn Spanish, a guitar, and a skateboard. All of this sounds like fun. Maybe he can enjoy a new hobby so that he doesn’t define himself on his job alone. And maybe he can find a new job or a way of approaching work that excites him.

I wouldn’t mind trying a new hobby myself, so I’m excited for Speckle, but then Tuca tells him that he should never try any of the hobbies he buys! According to Tuca, this is part of the process, spending a ton of money on hobbies you never try. Speckle is sad that Tuca won’t even let him play guitar. I’m getting disappointed with how Tuca keeps dunking on Speckle. Let the man enjoy his guitar. In the end, he goes to play guitar in town and sings Spanish on a skateboard. It was pretty funny to watch, and Speckle is pretty talented even if the people around him disagree. Tuca seems happy for him in the end though. I feel like Speckle and Tuca are friends that sort of mess with each other. Speckle is definitely going through a hard time. Tuca doesn’t really get how to support him, but she is trying.

Overall, I enjoyed this episode. I might review some older episodes, but I’m not sure if I will or not yet. I’ll definitely look at the season 3 finale that premiered. Tuca and Bertie is definitely an unusual show. It has absurd humor and the characters are totally over the top, but underneath all of that, and perhaps within the chaos, there is a heart. I love watching these characters and their relationships, and I’m excited to see what happens next.

Have you seen this episode of Tuca and Bertie? What do you think of this season so far? Let me know down in the comments below!

Shows

Helluva Boss Season 2 Episode 1 Reaction

The one where Stolas goes from a lonely child to a lonely adult

Helluva Boss is back and I have some opinions. In this episode, we see Stolas as a kid on his birthday. I’m glad we get to see him happy, even when he doesn’t have a reason to be. His father barely acknowledges or explains the gift he receives, and he doesn’t remember Stolas’s name.

Stolas doesn’t seem to notice though. He’s just happy it is his birthday and that his father acknowledges him a bit. He doesn’t know what the gift is exactly, but it makes him feel important.

He takes Stolas to the circus, and he sees Blitz for the first time and falls in love instantly.

Meanwhile, Blitz is hired by Stolas’s dad (who also voiced Blitz’s dad) to spend a day with Stolas. Blitz’s dad then instructs Blitz to steal from Stolas’s family while he’s there.

I like how we see Stolas as a kid. He’s cute. I enjoyed the moments between the two of them in this episode. Stolas is so excited that Blitz is spending time with him, he doesn’t even care if their “game” involves throwing his family’s possessions out the window.

Blitz and Stolas are at that age where the future sounds far away and all their dreams can come true. Blitz wants to run his own circus with an office and Stolas dreams of using his dad’s powers. I’m not sure their dreams are too far off, Blitz runs his own business, IMP, and has an office.

He seems put together on the outside, but his insecurities have come back to haunt him. Stolas has his powers, but they don’t provide him with any joy. He was forced to marry Stella, who treats him horribly and hits him, and his only happiness is watching his daughter have a somewhat normal life.

The writers were going for a contrast between childhood innocence and the brutalities of adulthood and it hit. But if we look back, we’ll see that both of their fathers were bad parents who will continue to let their children down.

There has also been some discourse online about Stella’s character. Some fans wish that her character had more nuance and that that her marriage with Stolas wasn’t all about her being the abusive one. In many unhealthy marriages, both parties are at fault and both sides have reasons for why they act so badly toward the other person. I’m conflicted on this. On one hand, sometimes one person in a relationship is a abusive, and they don’t need a backstory as to why. There are cases where men are victims and I feel like it doesn’t hurt when a narrative acknowledges that.

I kind of get that people would want nuance. Stella’s character is less interesting almost if she’s completely bad all the time. And in real life, marriages can be complicated. Maybe Stolas tried to love Stella but he didn’t and maybe Stella felt the same way. Maybe Stella was hurt by Stolas cheating because their family was all she had. In this episode, Stolas is a really sympathetic character and that’s awesome.

But I also think it could have been interesting if he was more morally grey. It is interesting to see characters who have some control over their environment and live with regrets and grow from there. It makes for a more interesting story than one where everyone is stuck in bad circumstances. It would be cool especially since the writers don’t seem to afraid to include morally grey elements to the story. This is Hell, so why not?

And with Blitz’s narrative, it would fit for Stolas to also have hurdles to get over before starting a relationship. After all, Blitz clearly has faults himself that he needs to work on.

Overall, I loved this episode. The animation style was gorgeous and the characters were fun to watch.

What did you think of this episode? Let me know down in the comments below.

Shows

Tuca and Bertie Season 3: Episode 3: The One Where Bertie Gets Eaten by a Snake Review

Tuca and Bertie Season 3: Episode 3: The One Where Bertie Gets Eaten by a Snake Review

In this episode, we pick up where we left off where Tuca and Bertie adjusting to the events of the previous episode. Tuca talks to Bertie about how she and Figgy have made some rules about his drinking. No home-brewing–it is gross apparently. Figgy follows up with one rule of his own–don’t tell him to stop drinking. Tuca is concerned, but she is excited about their next date.

Side note: Tuca and Figgy have this conversation when they went hunting. Bertie is surprised at what they are doing, but hunting seems like a popular activity in this world. In the Tuca and Bertie universe, hunting is essentially paintball game between two teams. No one dies, and all animals are safe. One paintball team just happens to include a deer. This is sounds more fun than actual hunting. Tuca can also climb up Figgy’s branches to get a better shot. I have no idea how the writers come up with these things.

Their date goes surprisingly well. Figgy doesn’t drink all afternoon, despite an offer of free wine, and it isn’t until dinner that he tries a drink that the waiter promotes as intellectual and special. The drink fits Figgy’s aesthetic, and Tuca says he can have a drink this time. She herself could never have just one drink without going overboard, but Figgy does okay. He has several drinks, but he doesn’t lose control or act differently. He and Tuca have fun together for the rest of the date, and she tells Bertie that it went well.

Bertie’s Self Perception and Her Snake

Meanwhile, Bertie is anxious about her new job. I’m still a bit confused about what is going on with Bertie. Did she quit her old job? There was no mention of her quitting before, but I assume she must have quit. There is no way she can hold a day job and go to the bakery during the day. She probably quit her old job offscreen when she decided to start her own bakery.

Bertie’s boss, Winter Garcia, wants her to present an idea to her for a new desert. Bertie spends all night racking her brain for ideas to lofi music, much to Speckle’s concern. We even get a clip of Bertie sitting at her desk by the windows jotting down ideas while lofi music plays. There is a cat at the window. I love the little reference there.

Also, someone needs to make a playlist with Bertie at the window. The writers are begging us to notice the lofi creation opportunity. If no one does, I’m about to seriously consider it. This series is starting to remind me of BoJack Horseman with all the references and gags, and I love it. I also like how this show features fairly relatable characters and talks about normal life stuff. If this show keeps going in this direction, it will be good.

This episode dives deeper into Bertie’s psyche and how her insecurities come to light throughout the day. She is frustrated with how she is viewed by other people. On the bus, people see her as cute and fairly helpless. Strangers see her as a pushover, as a man starts talking to her on the bus when she wants to be left alone and a woman hands her baby to Bertie to watch. Even when the man is clearly annoying her and the baby throws up on Bertie’s work clothes, no one cares.

Instead, these strangers feel entitled to her attention and her help, and neither of them even asked her before barging into her space.

The mom’s excuse is that she feels like she as a mom deserves a break, and she sees Bertie as a temporary caregiver. She thinks that her baby is everyone else’s job to care for as well as hers. Her child is her (and the father/her partner, or anyone who is raising the child with’s responsibility) alone. The man feels like he is interesting enough to deserve a woman’s attention. Bertie tries to defend herself and tell these people to leave her alone, but no one listens.

When she presents a her idea for Bug Bundt cakes, her boss isn’t impressed. The Bug Bunt cakes are super cute–all the bugs have different personalities and color schemes. (I want the recipe now.) But Winter finds them boring.

Why? The only reason I can think of why she’d disapprove is that bugs aren’t necessarily appetizing, but that’s not even valid. Bertie and Winter are both birds–they eat bugs, so the cakes should look delicious. Winter does approve Bertie’s male coworker’s lame idea–triangle shaped cookies.

It hurts when Bertie’s ideas are not chosen and when her boss refuses to take her seriously. Her boss sees her is the same way that the people on the bus see her. Winter looks at Bertie’s appearance, and she doesn’t listen to her ideas. For Bertie’ her self-image and confidence is determined by her physical appearance and how people view her. People see her as cute and timid, and thus, easy to trample all over. And Bertie has to battle people’s perceptions of her before she even begins to speak. Then, once she acts shy and like a people pleaser and confirms their biases, people treat her that way.

Bertie longs for a world where people will respect her and listen to her, and earning that respect isn’t easy.

Of course, this show has to include some wacky shenanigan to address Bertie’s appearance, so Bertie is eaten by a snake. When she is inside the snake, she can go about her day normally, but her appearance is hidden, and she has a little snake sitting at her feet that occasionally demands her attention.

Her doctor tells her that she will have to wait, and in a few days the snake will poop her out.

Bertie is initially terrified about what her boss will think, because apparently being swallowed by a snake is not contagious or harmful to those around you. So, she has to go to work, even if she’s looking a little green.

After, Tuca compliments Bertie and says that she looks great, and Bertie decides to embrace the snake. After all, people will see her differently now. They won’t see the cute, shy bird that they normally see when they look at her. This predicament could be life changing.

Bertie gets on the bus and everyone’s perception of her is altered. The talkative guy on the bus won’t sit anywhere near her, and the woman with a baby stays away. Bertie even stands up for herself and gets the talkative guy to leave another poor, unsuspecting girl on the bus alone.

When she gets to work, she suggests a new idea: desert salads. Her boss loves the salad idea and compliments her. She goes home to Speckle and she feels more confident when they are together. No longer focused on how he perceives her, she can focus on enjoying herself–snake and all.

Meanwhile, Tuca is insistent that she won’t get eaten by a snake during her date. Other people in town are getting eaten by snakes too, after a bunch of baby snakes were released from the bus. Figgy just listens to her and doesn’t comment. But when she is eaten at dinner, she tells Figgy not to say anything about it. Tuca decides to embrace the snake skin as well.

Not everyone will agree with me, but I liked the snake shenanigans, they were quite amusing to watch, and I love learning about all the different ailments in this universe. This world is quite unusual, and the interspecies relationships aren’t exactly clear. I like learning about this world that Hanawalt has created. As long as the shenanigans don’t impede character development, I don’t mind them. In this case, I felt like character development and worldbuilding worked together. I would like to see more of this.

Snake-free Life

When the snake poops Bertie out, the other snakes follow its lead, and Tuca is free as well.

Life returns to normal, as Bertie tries desperately to stay inside the snake before presenting her idea to her boss. The snake refuses to let her stay in the suit, and Bertie is left to resume her presentation in her own skin.

Bertie fails to impress her boss for a second time when she tries to promote her bundt cakes again. Her boss likes the idea of salad deserts. But, don’t salad deserts already exist? And if you replicated a salad exactly, what would you use for lettuce? The salad would likely be very thin. Would you use candy? That sounds kind of gross personally.

Winter says that you could sneak a desert salad to work to give the appearance that you are being healthy to your coworkers. Um, why would anyone do that? I mean, maybe? I feel like people would notice it was a desert, but maybe not. I once tried a desert that strongly resembled grilled cheese, so I guess I get the appeal–kind of. Bertie’s idea is still better, but it doesn’t matter because she works for someone and doesn’t have her own business where she can make the rules.

She goes back to being her normal self, and she learns that her appearance does impact how people view her. After questioning whether or not it was the snake that made people take Bertie so seriously or if Bertie the confidence all along. Tuca says:

“It was the snake.”

Bertie doesn’t find confidence easily, nor do the biases people have of her change. This scene felt realistic, and although Bertie doesn’t get a perfect solution, she does have the support of her boyfriend and friends.

Bertie comes home and complains about her baking troubles to Speckle, and he says that she had a great idea and loves her as she is. Bertie feels better and lets hope her boss starts to listen to her ideas in the future.

Her boyfriend, Speckle is sweet as usual in this episode, but I am a bit worried about him. He mentioned a “predatory loan” at work, but he seems to be putting his own needs aside for Bertie’s. Hopefully, Speckle gets some screen time, and Bertie can be there to support him. Speckle always seems chaotic and silly, but I wonder if he uses this to cover up for anxiety sometimes, either anxiety about work or with just life in general. He definitely has more to him that what meets the eye.

Tuca and Figgy: The Aftermath

Tuca also faces reality when Figgy tells her to leave him alone after their date. He wants some time to himself after their date. Tuca is a bit worried and decides to check up on him, and when she does, she walks into a dark room. The color contrasts with the show’s bright and colored scenery. Dead leaves and bottles are scattered on the floor, and Figgy sits in a chair with his roots in a tub of alcohol.

I didn’t expect the end of this episode to hurt so much. Figgy doesn’t drink like Tuca did, at parties. He was waiting to be alone to drink.

I don’t quite know what will happen to them next. Tuca broke up with him, but I’m not sure if he’s going to remember that she told him. He was pretty out of it at the time. I do know that his storyline can’t end, not yet. Even if he and Tuca are done for good, I am way too invested for the writers to give up on his character now.

I’m also not sure Tuca has entirely processed why her relationship with Kara was so unhealthy either. She might stay in another unhealthy relationship all over again with Figgy. I really hope not. I want her to be happy: either with Figgy, someone new, or single.

Have you seen episode 3 yet? What did you think? Let me know down in the comments below.

Shows

A Defense of Johnathan Byers in Stranger Things Season 4

Note: I will only be talking about his actions in Season 4. I still think it was gross for him to take pictures of Nancy in Season 1, and it is terrible that he never apologized for it. That being said, I think that the writers were terrible to him in Season 4 and I like his character overall.

In Season 4, Jonathan starts smoking weed and hanging out with his friend Argyle. He and Nancy are still together, but they are not visiting each other during Spring Break. I’m not sure if anyone has said this is out of character for Johnathan, but it is a disappointing storyline for many, especially people who like Johnathan and Nancy as a couple. I personally liked them as a couple, but I didn’t mind if they broke up either.

When it comes to fictional relationships, I like to see good writing, chemistry, and compatibility between characters. If characters have all three, sometimes I can enjoy couples who weren’t as good together in past seasons, but have since shown improvement in those areas. Character development can be a huge game-changer.

Jonathan and Nancy have several of these developments, so I liked them in general. Nancy and Steve… I don’t know. I like them both individually, but when they broke up in Season 2, they just weren’t in a good place. Nancy didn’t love him. It made sense. character development was good.

But in Season 3, the writers just made changes without really developing the characters. From then on, the writers of Stranger Things started doing this a lot.

One example would be Hopper and Joyce. In Season 3, I didn’t ship them at all. Hopper often yelled at Joyce, ignored her, and acted spiteful for no reason. His anger toward Mike and El was overblown, and he acted entitled to a date with Joyce. His anger alone was a red flag.

I remember feeling so uncomfortable just watching Hopper in Season 4, but I didn’t exactly have the words to say why. Especially after his final scene with El. He seems so genuine, but (almost) dying doesn’t automatically make you a better person. Nor does writing a heartfelt note (where you don’t actually apologize) redeem you for your wrongs.

I found a YouTube video that talks about this if you’re interested in learning more.

Basically, they were still supposed to be a couple. We were supposed to think they yelled—mostly Hopper yelled at her—because he liked her.

In Season 4, Hopper is a better. He doesn’t get angry or act the way he did in S3. He is much closer to the S2 Hopper that I loved. He and Joyce reunite, and I feel like I want to ship them now. They have chemistry.

Because Hopper changed and became a better person in Russia apparently. That’s good I guess, but the character development was weak.

But Jonathan becomes a joke character in the fourth season. But his relationship with Nancy—and their falling out—at least feels realistic.

It is a bit sad, watching them go in different directions.

I feel like Jonathan is one of those characters who people either like or don’t. He’s not charming and funny like Steve, and he doesn’t have a strong arc. He was never a jerk, and he wasn’t perfect. He had to step in and help his mom after his father left. He always has been there for his family, and the kind of love he has for them is often under appreciated. He does what he’s supposed to do. Jonathan doesn’t expect a thank you.

He doesn’t want to go far away for college because he doesn’t want to leave his mom and brother behind.

His girlfriend is the exact opposite. She loves her parents and she and her mom are sometimes close, but she doesn’t want their life. Nancy wants to be a journalist and to travel; she doesn’t want to let life happen to her. She wants to fall in love and stay in love and she won’t settle like her parents did. She wants to go to her dream school, Berkeley and succeed there.

Jonathan is different. He has a family that needs him—he feels, and he doesn’t have the financial ability to just go to college wherever he wants. He has to think about life differently. Jonathan has other things to consider. He realizes that he has to be practical when it comes to college.

He also doesn’t want to hold Nancy back. He knows she has big dreams and hopes for her future.

Johnathan knows their choices are tearing them apart, but he knows there is little either of them can do about it. He has no idea what the future holds for himself and he can’t imagine life after she heads off to college. He likes photography, but he doesn’t feel like he can pursue it as a career like Nancy can. But it hurts too much to think about, and he doesn’t have many people to talk about it with.

Will is going through his own stuff and so is his mom. He loves his family and he wants to help them and be there for them in any way he can.

And he’s lost, and I can’t blame him. I hope Season 5 remembers this Jonathan, the guy who is trying his best.

Steve used to be the same guy in Season 2. He is lost and confused about his place in the world. He has few friends, and he just lost his girlfriend. But now we know he’s going to be all right. He is happy.

And if Hopper—after all his behavior in Seadon 3— can be be happy with Joyce, why can’t any hero on this show get a happy ending?

What do you think? Do you have any predictions for Season 5. Let me know in the comments below

Shows

My list of the best couples on 10 Couples on TV

Spoilers for New Girl, Gilmore Girls + The Revival, Jane The Virgin, The Good Place, and Dickinson

I have to say: romance is a lot of fun. I love fictional couples and watching people develop feelings for each other. I feel like I live through fictional relationships sometimes. But I’m not sure I’m alone. So this week, I decided to compile a list of the TV couples that I ship the most and share them with you all.

10. Serena and Dan from Gossip Girl

I know this ship is a rather unpopular one, but I really liked these two. I never got around to finishing Gossip Girl, but Serena and Dan were a great couple in the first season. Dan is an outsider and Serena is the IT girl. They had a lot of chemistry, and I liked the drama that came with this couple. Blake Lively is also incredible. I liked her with Nate too, but these two were my first ship on this show, and I always rooted for them to get back together even after they broke up. That’s why I’m giving them a higher rating. Gossip Girl just had good ships in general. Most of them were really unhealthy, but the drama was fun to watch. It is one of those shows where almost everyone dates each other because the actors have chemistry with everyone.

Best Quote:

Serena to Dan: “I loved you and just because we broke up doesn’t mean that I could turn it off like that”

9. Morticia and Gomez from The Adams Family

It shouldn’t be surprising that I chose these two. I have seen The Adams Family as a movie and a play, and both times that I watched, one of my biggest takeaways was just how these two love each other. They are nothing like the typical sitcom couple where they don’t actually like each other. For some shows, husbands and wives hating each other or barely tolerating each other is a big punchline. Not funny, guys. If you’re looking for the perfect married couple, just look at Morticia and Gomez.

These two have been married for years, and they both adore each other and are passionately in love. They both love their rather strange lifestyle, and they get to do the weird parts of life together. I feel like a lot of media shows a couple fall in love, but not the aftermath. I like seeing these two married with kids navigating family life. They fight like a normal couple, of course, but they still always come to a solution. It is no wonder that many online lists put them as one of the best romances of all time.

Swoon-Worthy Quote:

Gomez: “How long has it been since we’ve waltzed?”

Morticia: “Oh, Gomez…”

Gomez: “…Hours.”

8. April and Andy from Parks and Rec

Okay. I absolutely love these two. When I first watched this show, I thought Andy was a pretty annoying boyfriend to Ann, but luckily, he improves so much in the next season. These two are also the grumpy/sunshine trope. Andy is a goofball slacker, and April is a goth slacker. When they get together, there is absolute chaos. They start as friends and then start liking each other and date pretty early in the series.

I was most surprised that the most childish couple of the show ended up getting married so early. But I kind of love it. Their wedding is the most random thing ever. They have a party with their friends, and then they announce their house party is actually their wedding. Andy wears a football jersey to his own wedding, which is pretty awesome. April says that she never really hated him in her vows, which is so her. I love how this couple are just fun whenever they’re together. Some couples become boring after they get together on TV shows because the writers don’t know what else to do with them. All the relationship drama stops. At best, they are reduced to background characters, and at worst, one of them cheats on the other.

But when April and Andy get married, they’re anything but boring. Also they aren’t organized or good at what they call adulting, but they’re figuring it out together. I can relate to them as someone who just graduated from college. I have no idea what I’m doing; these two don’t either–but they know they want to be together–and it works out. They don’t force themselves to grow old and boring. They know how to have fun together. They make each other laugh, and their personalities play off each other really well. They’re happy and know how to make each other laugh. I would say that’s pretty awesomesauce.

Best Quote:

Andy: “Aww Babe… you had a crush on me, that’s so embarrassing.”

April: “We’re married.”

Andy: “Still”

7. Jane and Rafael from Jane the Virgin

I started watching Jane the Virgin a while ago, and I fell in love with Jane and Rafael. Basically, the plot of their story is that Jane, a virgin, accidentally gets artificially inseminated when a doctor mixes up her pap smear with another woman. That woman is Petra, and Rafael is the fiancé and the father of Jane’s child.

Jane and Rafael actually met once before. They met a coffee shop years ago and kissed. It sounds like it is almost fate, but Rafael is with Petra and Jane is engaged to a man named Michael.

I liked Michael a lot too, but Rafael was just a sweetheart. He had his issues, but so did Jane. I loved how they always encouraged each other no matter what. Rafael always encouraged her writing and was willing to make sacrifices for Jane’s happiness. Jane encouraged Rafael and showed him that he could be a better man than his father was. These two also have so much passion and chemistry. Rafael is also incredibly good looking, so that helps. But even as they go from a couple to friends, I feel like neither of them truly stopped loving each other. I also liked how Rafael didn’t get along with Jane’s family right away. It takes some time for them. Especially after Michael’s passing. By the end, he loves her family, and they love him and he has been there with her through so many different life challenges. And despite all the hurdles, they get together in the end.

I liked how they are able to be friends as well, and they care about each other and are best friends even when they’re not dating.

Swoon-worthy quote:

Jane: “It’s your dream. Go for it, be brave.”

Rafael: “Hey, that’s my line.”

Jane: “Well, it works and it’s true.”

6. Jess and Rory from Gilmore Girls

I have to say, I normally don’t like whole bad-boy romance stories, but Jess from Gilmore Girls is my exception. He is Luke’s nephew, and he moves in with his uncle during the second season. He and Rory meet pretty quickly–Lorelai and Luke are close friends after all–and instantly feel a connection. Unfortunately for Jess, Rory is in a relationship with another guy named Dean.

Jess isn’t who you’d think of as Rory’s type. He is extremely intelligent, but he thinks school is a waste of time and doesn’t trust authority figures. Rory is dedicated to studying hard and heading to Harvard. The two of them are connected by a love of books (swoon!) and they end up dating after quite a bit of drama with Dean.

One of the best things about Jess and Rory is that although their paths in life and goals are somewhat different, they’re always pushing each other to be the best versions of themselves. Rory inspires Jess to write a book, and in the revival (major spoiler), Jess tells Rory that she should write a book about her and her mom. They also grow together and are inspired by the other person’s influence.

I will say that Jess was pretty flawed. His mother basically gave him over to Luke and his father left him, and Jess has problems with authority in general. Jess does grow to be a better person with Luke and Rory and even Lorelai’s influence. He leaves in the fourth season, but he does come back to visit.

This is one ship I like that doesn’t end up together. Honestly, I’m not sure if it is for the best or not. These two are great both as friends and as a couple. I like how much they cared about each other no matter what. I think if Amy Sherman Palladino ever made a second revival, I would love to see Jess and Rory get together. But even if it doesn’t happen, I’m grateful that these two were thing.

Best Quote:

Jess: “You know, Ernest only has lovely things to say about you.”

This is from a discussion where Rory wants Jess to read The Fountainhead and Jess wants Rory to read Hemingway.

5. Eleanor and Chidi from The Good Place

I haven’t finished The Good Place yet, but I love Eleanor and Chidi together. Chidi is a philosophy professor of ethics, and Eleanor is actually not supposed to be in The Good Place because she was just a bad person. There’s really no other way to say that. But Chidi is stubborn decides to teach her how to be good so that she can stay there. They do this by studying the philosophers and talking about ethics. For Chidi, this means teaching and talking about his passion, for Eleanor, it is learning that Aristotle is not pronounced “Chipotle.”

I love these two for their wildly different personalities. Chidi is an extremely indecisive guy who desperately wants to make the most ethical decision, but he can never decide. Eleanor is the poster-child for not caring. She is snarky and honest and has no filter. Eleanor is smart, but she just doesn’t care about anything or anyone but herself, at least at first. I like seeing them interact and react to each other.

Best Quote:

Eleanor: “I was dropped into a cave. You were my flashlight.”

The Plato reference gets me. Intellectual beauty–I love it. Honestly my best romantic quote on here.

5. Petra and JR – Jane the Virgin

Petra was one of my favorite characters on Jane the Virgin. She starts the series as Rafael’s fiancé and Jane’s rival. Petra makes some . . . interesting . . . decisions throughout the show. But it is mostly because her life and past has been incredibly chaotic. Most of these characters go through so much melodrama, but Petra has been through too much that she doesn’t deserve. Petra honestly might be my favorite character on this show. She’s tough and calculated, but she had to grow up that way.

After watching her pine over Rafael for so long, I was pleasantly surprised when she develops feelings for her lawyer, Jane Ramos. Because her name is so similar to our protagonist, Jane, they call her JR.

Petra is always so confident, which drew me to her character. She also always seems to want to be in control, so it was fun watching her fall for Jane and juggle feelings for someone.

Petra hires JR as her lawyer because Petra’s sister died. This is a long story, but it is not Petra’s fault. Jane and Petra end up getting together when they think the case if closed. Of course, this is a telenovela, so when you think it is over, it never truly is. But they break up and end up realizing that they love each other.

I went into ending this show with no idea how the writers would end it, but they gave Petra a perfect match.

She and JR are both ambitious and fiercely protective of the people they love. It was so nice to see Petra happy too, after all that she has been through. I get that this show is a telenovela, but there is so much drama. From husbands coming back from the dead to crime lords, it is quite the ride. These two are amazing though, the way they love and care about each other. I love how JR fits into Petra’s life so well, with her daughters, with her past–all of it. They have their bumps in the road, but they just fit together. They’re amazing.

Best Quote:

Petra: “I love you too, which is scary because its so fast. But here’s the thing, I’ve never felt about anyone the way I feel when I’m with you. And I think I just quoted Dirty Dancing. But that’s the kind of cheesy thing you make me do.”

JR: “I happen to love . . . Dirty Dancing

4. Lorelai and Luke from Gilmore Girls

I’ve talked before about how much I love the grumpy/sunshine trope and these two fit this trope to a T. Lorelai is a single mom and a huge coffee fanatic and Luke owns a diner that she goes to every day. They have been friends for years. One of my favorite tropes is the friends who have been pining for each other forever and Luke and Lorelai are great together as friends and as a couple. They have hilarious banter and if there’s any guy for Lorelai, it is Luke.

The writers of this show threw in so much drama later in the series, but I still love them together. I like how their relationship shows different love languages. Luke for instance, shows Lorelai that he loves her by works of service. He makes her an ice rink when they’re dating. Love doesn’t have to be said all the time or showed in a certain way. This show is a good example of that.

Best Quote:

Both of them:“Will you just stand still”

3. Schmidt and Cece from New Girl

Schmidt may be my favorite New Girl character. He is very high-maintenance and interested in brands and labels. One of his quotes is “Can Somebody Get My Towel? It’s In My Bedroom Next To My Irish Walking Cape.” He has an Irish walking cape, and he owns more hair products than anyone in the loft. He is also a ladies man and a huge flirt. The group has a douchebag jar for Schmidt to put money in when he told Cece he would marry her the moment he met her. Cece wasn’t sure what to think of him at first, but after they spend some time together, she develops feelings for him. They are on-and off again and then finally end up getting married.

Best Quote:

Schmidt: “You like me? For my personality”

Cece: “I was surprised too”

2. Emily and Sue from Dickinson

I absolutely love Emily Dickinson poetry, so I was pleasantly surprised when I watched the new Apple TV adaption. In real life, Sue Gilbert is Emily’s friend and sister-in-law. Sue married her brother Austin. Literary critics have speculated that the two were in love. In the series, Emily and Sue are best friends and fall in love and carry on a passionate, secret romance.

They both have amazing chemistry, and Emily writes poetry about Sue. Falling in love with your best friend is the dream. Some of the best couples are friends who have known each other forever. These two also have amazing chemistry. The show vibes are amazing, and these two are the best part. And I’m a huge fan of Emily Dickinson and Hailee Seinfeld, so it is pretty great. Emily is outgoing and hilarious and Sue is more introverted and sweet. Their relationship is definitely messy, but their love for each other never is.

Best Quote:

Sue: Emily, I love.
Emily: Stop lying to me.
Sue: I love you, and I felt you in the library because you’re always with me. I can’t escape from you because the only true thing I will ever feel is my love for you.

1. Nick and Jess from New Girl

New Girl is a show about a woman named Jess who moves in with three guys after her ex-boyfriend cheats on her. When we first meet Jess, she is a quirky elementary school teacher. Jess is also super sweet and isn’t afraid to be childish or silly. She mixes the group dynamics in the best possible way.

Nick is about the opposite. He is also a rather unusual love interest. Nick is a bartender and a law-school drop out. He is an underachiever and he has an unfinished novel called The Pepperwood Chronicles.

He is also a great friend and, when they get together–a great boyfriend. They both care about each other so much, even when they are not dating. They’re also one of those couples who clash a bit in personality, and it keeps things interesting. Nick can be his goofiest, truest self with Jess and vice versa. They also have so much chemistry. It is crazy. Their first kiss was wow…

I haven’t seen many sitcom couples that have this much chemistry and aren’t completely toxic (Ross and Rachel cough). They have their problems of course, and the writers broke them up for no reason, but they’re just great together. As friends, as a couple, as people supporting each other. I love them so much, and they’re the kind of couple who do anything for each other. Nick will move mountains for Jess and she’d do the same for him.

Best Quotes (2 this time, because I can’t help it):

Jess: “There’s Something About Him…I See Him And My Heart Explodes.”

-Swoon… I can’t with these two. They just love each other so much. The passion, the drama, the witty banter. I love this so much.

Nick: “No! not like this!”

This is before they start dating. Nick and Jess are playing a game with the gang, (True American, which I still want to play), and they are given a dare to kiss. The two of them are locked in a room together until they kiss, but Nick just can’t kiss her over a dare. He yells “No! Not like this” and Jess is confused, so he climbs out a window to escape. He ends up kissing her later that night and says “I meant something like that.” I love this scene so much. The man is a great kisser, so much passion. It was probably the best way to start their relationship. 100/10.

So, that is my list of my favorite TV couples. What did you think? Do you like any of these shows? What couples do you ship? Why? Let me know down in the comments below!

Shows

“I Am Not Okay With This” Ended and Here is Why I Will Never Be Okay With That

“I Am Not Okay With This” Ended and Here is Why I Will Never Be Okay With That

Why I Can’t Get Over “I Am Not Okay With This” Ending

As Stranger Things Season 4 rolls around, I find myself missing a good superpower-themed show. I heard about I am Not Okay with This on Netflix a while ago. I didn’t get around to watching it until this November. After watching the first season, I am not okay with this show ending. The show begins with Sydney Novak, Sophia Nills, an unpopular 17-year-old who discovers that she has telekinesis a year after her father’s death. She recently started high school in a Pennsylvania town.

Fun Fact: the show was filmed in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and the bowling alley, Baden Bowl, is near the town I grew up in. Surprisingly, there are quite a few shows that take place in Pennsylvania, but I haven’t seen many filmed near me.

Sydney recently moved to live a pretty normal life. She skips football games and hangs out with her best friend and fellow new kid Dina. Syd’s pretty chill with that, she loves spending time with Dina, and the popular kids are huge jerks. She watches her little brother after school. She is also grieving her father’s death and has a difficult relationship with her mother. Her world starts to erupt when her best friend tells her that she is dating the popular football player Brad Lewis. Sydney then starts hanging out with her neighbor Stanley “Stan” Barber.

Sydney’s story is compelling from the start. The show starts with her walking through the streets in a fancy dress covered in blood.

The show is not subtle being a teenager and having a superpower is hard.

I Am Not Okay With This deals with themes like depression and suicide. Also, there is blood. If you put on the first episode, you will see the protagonist covered in blood–that is a warning.

The story stars Sydney Novak, played by Sophia Lillis. Sydney starts the story off pretty snarkily.

Dear diary, go f*** yourself.

Just kidding, I don’t know what to write in this stupid thing.”

This sums up her character pretty well. She is sarcastic and sometimes cynical on the outside. On the inside, she feels alone and has no idea what she is doing–she is not sure how to tell people either. She puts up a bit of a front and, she’s not a jerk. Syd is a grieving teen who is figuring it out just like everyone else. 

She looked familiar, and I found out that she played Beverly Marsh in IT and was not surprised. I, unfortunately, have not seen IT yet, but from what I can tell…she fits the horror/supernatural genre well. Her character experiences a wide range of emotions, and her acting was terrific.

The supporting actors were wonderful as well. I loved Stan–the man has a killer fashion sense and is hilarious. The first awkward interaction between Stan and Sydney cracked me up. They begin as neighbors who make small talk occasionally but never hang out. He awkwardly asks if she wants to hang out and get high and, Syd watches this odd guy with shock, confusion. What is this guy? Because Dina suggested that she also find a date for the homecoming dance, she agrees.

Spoilers Ahead- Warning!

If you dislike seeing (some) spoilers before watching as much as I dislike Brad, I’d suggest reading this post after you watch.

I was into the show from the first scene; it looks awesome. The vibes are immaculate. The whole time, I kept wondering about the origin of Sydney’s powers. After all, she seems to be the only character in this story with them. Her abilities kind of come out of nowhere, and it is great. Her powers come out when she feels overwhelming emotions. Where do they come from? What will happen next? We do not get all the answers, but I felt pretty shocked by what I found out. The ending was pretty satisfying in an incomplete sort of way.

I liked how Syd’s powers were a sort of metaphor for her dealing with depression, anxiety, grief, and figuring out her sexuality. Sydney feels alone, and she’s grieving without many people to support her.

Being a teenager is rough. The show shows us all the worst parts of high school, the ones we’d rather forget, the ones that make us want to curl into a ball and cry. There are bullies, boring classes, and detentions, but friends make it a little easier. It was also nice to see actual teenagers playing high schoolers. The show feels realistic that way.

It is like Stranger Things, but a little more mature and dark. Sydney starts as a loner whose crush and only friend ditches her to hang out with her boyfriend, but by the end of the story–she has a trio and a potential girlfriend on the horizon. It was great to see Syd, Dina, and Stan hanging out. Knowing she has friends to support her as she moves forward with what she knows about herself and her family was great to see.

I loved Stan and his dynamic with Syd. There are not many shows where a guy and girl are just friends, and I liked how things were pretty chill for them. The homecoming scene reminded me of Pretty and Pink a little bit, the lights and the dance, and Molly Ringwald has a similar haircut. Stan reminded me of Ducky a little bit. He is funny, sweet, and an outcast, a perfect friend to mock football games with Syd.

The 1990s and 1980s aesthetics interweave throughout the story–like Stranger Things. Both have a similar premise, but I Am Not Okay with This is darker and more realistic. Stranger Things plays to the nostalgia and the family dynamics go smooth enough. I Am Not Okay With This also jumps straight into the drama and hard feelings about high school. I also liked how the show focuses on a small cast of characters. If the show continued, they could have developed the characters further, and it could have been something special. 

I did like the modern update too. Stan is such a good friend to Sydney. He genuinely cares about her and thinks it is freaking awesome that she has superpowers. Although she is unsure what to make of him, Sydney grows to like Stan as a person and friend. Stan is strange, but he is also unapologetically himself and pretty content with life. Sydney can learn from him in that way. I loved how their friendship continues and goes back to normal even after Sydney says she likes Dina. 

Sydney and Dina

Speaking of romance, her relationship with Dina is so wholesome. Both characters seem like they have their person. A significant other is does not complete you or make your problems go away, but they are loving and supportive and the best person for you. 

Dina helps Syd out of her shell and makes her so happy. Sydney is so closed off, sarcastic, and quiet. Energetic, sweet, and fun-loving Dina seems like a perfect match for Sydney. I like how their relationship builds slowly, but I could have seen less of Brad–the moments where the two of them are together are small but beautiful.

She keeps me laughing, even when I want to melt to the floor.”

I wish the show continued, so we could see them more as a couple and get to know Dina better. On the bright side, Brad pretty much sucked– and I am glad he is gone. He was the worst kind of jock guy on TV and treated women like tissues. He keeps using them and then picks up another one. He has plenty of lovely lines like–when he talks to Syd for the first time,

 Jesus, do you ever smile?” 

The ending was satisfying but also gross and disturbing as it should be.

I read that the writers did not want romance to be the end-all-be-all for the characters. The family relationships are well-developed and dynamic.

Family Relationships

Her mother, Maggie, for instance, has been through hell. She lost her husband and now works a full-time job as a waitress to support her family. Working long hours in customer service is rough, especially if you have coworkers who always call off and make you cover their shifts. It is still disappointing watching her ignore her children’s grief and Sydney’s anger towards her. Her children lost their father too, and they are all struggling. I understand that she is grieving and frustrated. I do. But one line she says made it hard for me to sympathize with her, at least at first. It is the one scene where the two sit on the couch and talk, the one time her mother isn’t running around or off to work. Syd tells her mother: “Sometimes, I feel like the people I love don’t love me back.”

 Syd says this to her mom after a fight with Dina, but it applies to everyone in her life. Sydney is thinking of Dina a little, but she mostly thinks of her mother in this scene. The mother always seems judgemental and seldom seems loving. Her mother criticizes her while constantly needing her support. She never gets anything in return and the fact that Maggie can’t see that hurts. She is a kid seeking reassurance from a parent, desperate to hear that people (she) love her, that she is important. Her mother hits her back with “Well, maybe you’re aiming too high, hon.”

Sometimes, I feel like the people I love don’t love me back.

Well, maybe you’re aiming too high, hon”

Maggie’s words feel like a raw knife in the back. Man, it is brutal out there.

Syd’s mom sucks here, but I don’t think she said this to spite her daughter. She and Syd end up bonding later before the dance. She helps Syd get ready and, she talks about dancing with Syd’s father at a high school dance and feeling like she knew he was the one. Her actual marriage didn’t live up to the fantasy. She mentions how Syd’s Dad wasn’t present even when he was home–he hid in the basement and kept things from his wife. After we hear about her father’s situation at the end, I can’t even imagine what must have been like for both of them. Syd maintained a loving image of her father, which was for the best. Maggie seems like she was going through this all alone and didn’t have anyone to confide in. So they all grieved his death alone.

She feels like the hope in love she felt in high school was aiming too high. Her marriage never measured up to the early parts of her relationship. There were times where she did not feel loved by her husband; I understand her cynicism. She is not completely closed off though. In that last scene with her daughter, Maggie tells Syd about when she went to a dance with Sydney’s father and felt like she just knew that he was the one. She seems hopeful that Sydney will experience a love like that too. Maggie never apologizes for her words earlier, but she is trying to be better, more present. Maggie starts to see that there is hope for her daughter, and her as well, after all.

Netflix's I Am Not Okay With This Cast & Character Guide

Sydney’s younger brother was also a great addition to the cast. He and Sydney have a pretty good relationship. They annoy each other, and he makes weird mac and cheese, but they have each other’s backs. When she hears Richard making fun of her brother, she goes off: 

“Well, let me tell you something. One day, it’s all gonna go downhill, buddy. Your life will be so pathetic, you’ll attend high school reunions because you know what? Nothing else is ever gonna happen for you in your entire life. Yeah, you won’t even have a dog!”

If that isn’t a great roast, I don’t know what is.

The aesthetic is also pretty cool. The show references to its predecessors and includes references and fashion, and I am here for it.

I really liked the last episode, the show builds one conflict the entire series, and the payoff is so satisfying. Will Syd follow the same patterns her father did? Will she break the cycle and use her powers for good? The hooded figure shocked me to the core. I expected Syd to end up alone. He seems pretty helpful, but he could be a secret villain. Both of those sound fantastic. He probably knew her father and holds similar powers and realizes that she needs someone to help her learn to control them. Sydney needs a guide to help with her powers, beyond Stan’s comic books, which are appreciated but not necessarily helpful when you just blew a guy’s head off at homecoming. At least she doesn’t have to process this alone.

Most of the show is Syd slowly realizing her powers. This is a huge event to grapple with clearly, and the stakes jump when someone shows up to help. The balance is pretty good at the beginning too. She gets angry and intense, and then we have teen drama or iconic moments.

The Show’s Portrayal of Theaphy

I have a kind of criticism. The story begins with Syd’s therapist telling her to keep a journal, and her narration is in a journal format. I was kind of surprised that therapy was not very present in Sydney’s story since it began with a therapist. Sydney sees a therapist at her school as she processes her father’s death. But she does not talk to her therapist much except to get the journal. Syd has to deal with her emotions alone so, she lashes out and boom powers. She would have to keep her powers a secret to a therapist unless she chose to tell them. A few recent shows portray characters going to a therapist and benefiting from talking to someone, and this show felt kind of regressive on the topic.

In This is Us and Never Have I Ever the therapists are characters of their own. Both Devi and Randall talk to someone to help process loss and trauma. Sydney’s therapist was pretty bad, but there are bad therapists out there. I guess it feels stereotypical. Syd has a bad therapy experience that says write your feelings down and, it will all be okay. I am going on a side rant, but it is a valid criticism of the show. Plot-wise, I get that she needed to be alone to go full telekinesis mode. Perhaps, they could have developed this more next season. Sydney could have used therapy to help process her father’s death and her emerging powers, even if she did keep them a secret.

Dina and Sydney a Complaint/Critique

I loved this story. The amount of character development and plot was paced well in such a short season. I also loved Stan, he was hilarious. I enjoyed all his scenes. I was disappointed that Sydney and Dina didn’t have more scenes together. We get to know Stanley Barber more than the girl Sydney is in love with, and I wish it could have been different. I guess I just wanted to see more of them. The scenes we saw were great, so showing her more would have made it better.

I wish Stan would have not had a crush on Sydney either. I loved his character and I wish he could have happiness at the end, whether he meets a new love interest or is happy another way– I wanted more. The cliche where the guy likes his best friend and she doesn’t like him back feels a little cliche. Haven’t we seen enough Ducky and Andies and Steve and Robins to last a lifetime? I didn’t mind this too much, and it made sense to the plot so this is a relatively minor complaint. It can be realistic, for sure. But just generally, close male and female friendships without romantic feelings would be great to see.

Overall Thoughts

 I Am Not Okay With This has a promising first season to what could have been a fantastic supernatural show. The ending has so many unanswered questions; there are so many ways this story could go next. How many other people have powers? Who was the hooded figure on the roof? Why do Sydney’s powers only come from anger and anxiety? Is getting revenge on people who do wrong ex: Brad, using her powers morally okay? There are so many ways this story could go.

I wanted to hear more about Sydney’s father and his life and how he discovered his powers. I wanted a happy ending for Sydney, Dina, and Stan, and it was, but there were so many unanswered questions. Diana and Sydney just started talking about their relationship. They had such potential to grow as a couple and Dina was hilarious. Where did her positive attitude come from, when did Sydney and her meet for the first time? Did Sydney like her right away? They could have been so good together.

I wanted to hear more Stanley Barber lines too, and maybe for him to find happiness–whether that be in a romantic relationship or whatever. So many of Sydney’s problems are left in the open. Like, how does she even process what happens next? The end was okay, I guess. I am not okay with how it just left me on a cliffhanger. I’m not okay that these characters’ lives are on a permanent hiatus and I will never know what happens to them. We’ll never know if that stranger was there to help and where Sydney goes moving forward. The portrayal of her mental health struggles was well done, and her performance felt real in a way I haven’t seen in too many shows like this. Another season where Sydney is processing through these events with the support of others could help many teens feel seen. Seeing her get out of a place of isolation and anger could have been an uplifting story.

I am disappointed yet again that Netflix canceled a great show. Although it was short, I enjoyed the first season and watched it all in one day. I recommend I Am Not Okay With This to anyone who loves the 80s and 90s aesthetic, dark comedy, family drama, and superhero stories. It’s a good show to watch on a break or in a day because it is so short. It flies by, but you will not regret watching. I am Not Okay with This takes place in the same universe as End of the F***** world, which could also be cool to check out if you are left wanting more. I’m watching it right now, and the humor is similar and dark. The review for season one might come out at some point.